The Longest Fibromyalgia Flare in Years; New Chronic Neck Pain

Three years ago I was rear ended while stopped at a red light. The van totaled my cars rear, subsequently totaling the car. It, and me, were shoved by the impact to the end of a large intersection. I have suffered through numerous physical and mental issues due to this, lately it’s my neck that’s wreaking the havoc I’m enduring every day, every minute.

The impact inuded whiplash, I was “out” during my trip across the streets, but know my head was bobbing away. I tried to see a specialist about my neck pain but with all my other injuries, the process got started and then I dropped the ball. I was overwhelmed with so many doctors appointments. My family helped me with virtually everything for two and a half years, I was really in bad shape. Today, I am in medium shape.

The last month or so, instead of experiencing neck pain several times a week and when I lay down to sleep, I am having chronic pain in the neck! Those of us with fibromyalgia know that our neck and shoulder area is already a tender area. My neck pain is increasing the trigger point pain in this area due to tight muscles or something else that I haven’t had diagnosed yet. All I know is it hurts! This combination has kept me on my coach, or in bed, for almost two weeks now. At first I was accepting of living with increased pain; thinking it would calm down. It’s not.

I am not feeling very calm about it today. I am feeling angry. And, that’s ok. But, it’s not going to be alright if it screams pain that stops me from all activities of living, except walking my dog, for much longer. The only thing I am accepting right now is that it’s time for me to go back to the specialist, and I need comfort food. Chocolate sounds really good right about now.

THE Continuing Question; Opioids Use for Chronic Pain

One-third of long-term users say they’re hooked on prescription opioids – The Washington Post
https://apple.news/ASaZtPbh5QxepZLsdPPEaXg

Its been several months since I’ve posted anything in my blog, but this news piece warrants my response. This is only my opinion on this subject, as someone who has chronic pain and as one  who uses opiates for the relief of that pain, I have something to say that’s important on the subject. The very first thing I noted in this article was the use of the words words, “addicted or dependent”.  After 16 years of use for my chronic pain I am dependent on opiates. This is very different from someone who becomes an addict, and until this difference has been statistically weeded out we need to stop blaming people with pain and they are doctors for the epidemic of addiction.blaming people with pain and they are doctors for the epidemic of addiction.

 

I have stated in previous blogs that the other medications that have been developed in the last decade don’t work for me, that doesn’t rule out that they work for other people because they do. One of the main tenants of getting rid of using opioids for chronic pain is that there are other medications out there, does this meanthis mean that everyone needs to stop using pain medication because there is the chance of addiction?  No. The reason is exactly as I stated above the other medications don’t work for everyone. Does this mean that doctor should be very clear about trying other medications first, yes I believe they should.  Does this also mean that doctors should be very clear about what opiates are and how they can affect your body, how one can become dependent on them, yes they should. However, I for one am not am not willing to take the blame for people who become addicted. If anyone should take on this  plane game, it should be the doctors who don’t monitor their patients use closely.

When,http://www.prescriberesponsibly.com/articles/urine-drug-testing

In addition to using opiates, I use alternative methods of self-care as well. I’ve written and lot here about having a tool kit of methods to help one deal with their chronic pain. Any responsible doctor would offer these tools to their patients . But as the doctor and patient relationship develops over time, each patient will be able to use different tools differently at different times and the doctor needs to understand that. I’m not sure that it this point in time  doctors really understand this clearly. In the end I think it comes down to doctors being better educated about chronic pain in general and the different ways in which patient can help themselves, doctors can help patients and the different ways that patients may or may not respond to different methods.  The relationship between patient and doctor is always a two-way street. If you don’t have a comfortable give-and-take relationship with your doctor I suggest that you find a new doctor, one who is willing to explore over the years with you different ways that work at different times without judgment.

What do you think about this subject what do you think about this subject?