THE Continuing Question; Opioids Use for Chronic Pain

One-third of long-term users say they’re hooked on prescription opioids – The Washington Post
https://apple.news/ASaZtPbh5QxepZLsdPPEaXg

Its been several months since I’ve posted anything in my blog, but this news piece warrants my response. This is only my opinion on this subject, as someone who has chronic pain and as one  who uses opiates for the relief of that pain, I have something to say that’s important on the subject. The very first thing I noted in this article was the use of the words words, “addicted or dependent”.  After 16 years of use for my chronic pain I am dependent on opiates. This is very different from someone who becomes an addict, and until this difference has been statistically weeded out we need to stop blaming people with pain and they are doctors for the epidemic of addiction.blaming people with pain and they are doctors for the epidemic of addiction.

 

I have stated in previous blogs that the other medications that have been developed in the last decade don’t work for me, that doesn’t rule out that they work for other people because they do. One of the main tenants of getting rid of using opioids for chronic pain is that there are other medications out there, does this meanthis mean that everyone needs to stop using pain medication because there is the chance of addiction?  No. The reason is exactly as I stated above the other medications don’t work for everyone. Does this mean that doctor should be very clear about trying other medications first, yes I believe they should.  Does this also mean that doctors should be very clear about what opiates are and how they can affect your body, how one can become dependent on them, yes they should. However, I for one am not am not willing to take the blame for people who become addicted. If anyone should take on this  plane game, it should be the doctors who don’t monitor their patients use closely.

When,http://www.prescriberesponsibly.com/articles/urine-drug-testing

In addition to using opiates, I use alternative methods of self-care as well. I’ve written and lot here about having a tool kit of methods to help one deal with their chronic pain. Any responsible doctor would offer these tools to their patients . But as the doctor and patient relationship develops over time, each patient will be able to use different tools differently at different times and the doctor needs to understand that. I’m not sure that it this point in time  doctors really understand this clearly. In the end I think it comes down to doctors being better educated about chronic pain in general and the different ways in which patient can help themselves, doctors can help patients and the different ways that patients may or may not respond to different methods.  The relationship between patient and doctor is always a two-way street. If you don’t have a comfortable give-and-take relationship with your doctor I suggest that you find a new doctor, one who is willing to explore over the years with you different ways that work at different times without judgment.

What do you think about this subject what do you think about this subject?

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Important Conversation Last Week With my Primary Care Physician and Opioids

http://blogs.fda.gov/fdavoice/index.php/2016/02/changing-course-a-new-approach-to-opioid-pain-medication-at-fda/

My treatments for chronic pain are changing. This is a personal decision I chose after several years of thought and a trial run varied products in the Medical Marijuana dispensaries. Every person who lives with constant pain must decide their own paths, we are each unique with unique pain patterns and life styles. Previously, I have tried the SSRI’s, the anti-seizure meds, and over-the-counter medications. They all failed to work for me. Either they didn’t touch my pain or they fogged up my brain more than it already gets fogged. I have been left with opioid use. Opioid use as prescribed is still very hard on our entire system and causes physical dependency. This creates a slight need to increase the dosage every few years to achieve the same relief.

In order to address my overall health and decrease my dosage, I began trying CBD first, then added in a low dose of THC at night and during flares. After doing this for the last three months, I am seeing a decrease in my opioids; not dramatic but by two pills on “normal” days and more on flare days! I blog about honest relationships and taking personal responsibility with your doctor. Last week, I informed my PCP about my use and my intention to radically decrease my opioid use over a period of several months.

He was completely supportive. He believes medical marijuana has many cross modalities benefits in pain control and much less toxic effects on our system. During this discussion he informed me that the FDA will be radically changing who is allowed opioids and who can prescribe it. This will occur within five years.

I feel that this is not common knowledge in our population and decided to inform my peers. I also decided to be transparent about my decisions in pain treatment. It won’t fit for everyone, it’s not simple for me! THC knocks me out cold, meaning it’s not an option if I go out or need to work. It could adversely effect me in job searches or closing a job offer. For me, natural, less toxic, pain relief is the first step to living better, the rest will sort itself out.

Please read, and research further, the above link.